DIY WINDOW CORNICE - FABRIC COVERED BOX VALANCE ON A BUDGET



If you remember my dining room table reveal, you'll remember this chenille damask fabric that I used to recover the chairs...and I fell in love with it.

I had leftover fabric and I still needed a window treatment in my kitchen - oh yes, did I mention that I don't have a dining room. My beautiful dining table is plopped right in the middle of my kitchen. And no...it's not a kitchen/dining combo. Just a kitchen. With the dining room table in the middle of it. No illusions of grandeur my way, ok? I just make the best of what I have. And pretend....

Ahhh yes, back to my leftover fabric. I decided to I could tackle a DIY Window Cornice - you know, one of those fabric covered box valances? (For those of you, like me, that have no idea what "Cornice" means).

I've seen people make them with foam board, plywood and everything in between, but I set out to my local Lowes to find the absolute cheapest option. Because this part will never be seen under the fabric, it didn't matter to me what it looked like.

I scoured the store and finally found garage shelving board. It basically looks like cut pieces of particle board...like you see used on cheaper laminate type desks. It's exactly the right height to top a window and comes in 8 foot sections. The best part....it's about six bucks. OK, that's NOT the best part. THE BEST PART - I found pieces with dips/chips/imperfections and at Lowe's that means 50% off. YES, about $3 for an 8 foot piece. Total score. ( Yes, anything in the lumber department at Lowe's is always 50% off if dented, scratched,etc. Cashiers already know this so no fuss required!)

Now, my kitchen window is a set of 3 windows and I wanted one continual cornice, instead of 3 individual ones. So, I had to do a little extra work because of the width. (Extra piecing added by hubs to extend the full length of windows)
Here's the lowdown:

  • Measure window
  • Cut board to width
  • Cut smaller pieces for each side to attach to wall
  • Wood glue & screws to attach end pieces
  • Use L angle brackets to attach to wall (about $1 at my Lowe's) To cover with fabric:

    I didn't not want to cushion mine - I wanted a straight clean valance look.
  • Cut fabric to fit, leaving extra on top/bottom/sides to wrap around & attach.
  • Use any spray adhesive on front of board for smooth clean tight fit on fabric
  • Wrap edges and secure with staple gun and/or hot glue.

    Here's my messy kitchen and hubs installing to the wall for me while my Grandbaby pretends she is doing the same. You could totally screw in the L angles to the wall yourself, but mine was heavier because it was over 8 foot long, so I had to pull out the begrudged female in distress card. I don't recommend it - you always pay for it later :D
    Okay...Let me redeem myself....I really did clean up after, simplified top of fridge decor and added a blind to the one that has been missing for oh,...the last 3 years.
    I'm in love with my new window treatment, matching my the dining chairs ! About an hour tops and well under $10.... What do you think?



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  • 5 comments:

    1. that is brilliant!and very very stylish!

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    2. such a great idea..this looks very awesome and stylish too, i love the color and instead of using wood you can use cloth for replacement..

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    3. If you're longing for some change of appearance in your room, a cornice board is one feature you can play with. It is easy to work on since it normally works in the law of contraries. When you have plain or light walls, go with printed or radiant fabrics, and viceversa. The shabby material you used is very nice, Mimi. :] Willene@Roofing & More, Inc.

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    4. what if I wanted to use multiple fabrics...how would I do that?? If I pad the inside then every fabric I staple down will have a dent in the padding..???

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      Replies
      1. As posted, I did not use any padding so I am unsure what result you would get. In my version, explained step by step above, that wouldn't be a problem. Good luck!

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